Forget about social distancing at festivals. Here comes the extended reality

People will be able to put on a pair of virtual reality headphones, apparently teleporting to a Korean cultural festival that hosts an XR live broadcast concert;  this could be the first trial in the world.

MOND FORD / Things

People will be able to put on a pair of virtual reality headphones, apparently teleporting to a Korean cultural festival that hosts an XR live broadcast concert; this could be the first trial in the world.

Can the same concert be held in two different places at the same time? Normally, the answer is no, but with technology, this is what will happen when the organizers of a Korean cultural festival try a world first novelty: organizing a 360 XR live broadcast concert.

Although Aotearoa hosts concerts, sports games and festivals almost as usual,

Organizers of the Korean cultural festival, known as K-Festival and to be held in Auckland on August 14, are, however, planning to take into account the uncertainties of the pandemic.

Artists such as King Kapisi, Ineffa Lucas and Rina Chae will perform, as well as the Auckland Symphony Orchestra. Using extended reality technology, also known as XR, people who can’t get to Auckland will be able to put on a pair of virtual reality glasses, apparently teleporting to the event as if they were actually there.

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XR mixes real and virtual environments and is often described as the extension of human experiences due to augmented reality (where real objects are enhanced by computer-created information) and virtual reality, where a simulated experience can be similar or different. to real experiences. world.

In downtown Wellington, Associate Professor Taehyun Rhee of the University of Victoria runs the Computational Media Innovation Center.

Associate Professor Taehyun Rhee of Victoria University of Wellington says that

MOND FORD / Things

Associate Professor Taehyun Rhee of Victoria University in Wellington says that “if all goes well, we look forward to showing live streaming of the concert with real-time mixed reality effects at the K-Festival.”

With glasses, one of the XR experiences the center helped create was Te Ngākau Civic Square, with schools of fish swimming around.

The organizers of the K-Festival, who they attended, asked them if they wanted to collaborate in the live broadcast of the festival concert using XR technology.

While they had to be flexible on the day, Rhee said, about four to five cameras will be installed in the stadium.

One of the XR experiences the Computer Media Innovation Center helped create was the Te Ngākau Civic Square, with schools of fish swimming around.

MOND FORD / Things

One of the XR experiences the Computer Media Innovation Center helped create was the Te Ngākau Civic Square, with schools of fish swimming around.

“We will do 360 ° live video broadcasts while adding real-time visual effects,” Rhee said. The concert would also be available on YouTube, “he said,” If all goes well, we hope to show live streaming of the concert with real-time mixed reality effects at the K-Festival. “

That meant people who couldn’t physically visit the concert could practically be there via YouTube’s 360 live video, ideally in virtual reality headphones, he said.

360 cameras will be installed in the stadium so that the look of the K-Festival concert can be played live via XR.

MOND FORD / Things

360 cameras will be installed in the stadium so that the look of the K-Festival concert can be played live via XR.

People felt like they were part of the audience, no matter where they were, he said. “I think it could be the first trial in the world, as we know it.”

By combining real events with this technology, New Zealand could lead a post-coronavirus media environment, Rhee said.

The organizers of the K-Festival, they do

Supplied

The organizers of the K-Festival, who make “finger hearts” in the Korean style, have been working with Victoria University Associate Professor Taehyun Rhee, head of the Center for Innovation in Computer Media, to host parts of the festival through extended reality technology.

Festival director Gio Jin said it was a rare opportunity to have such events in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

The theme of the festival was “better together” and the use of this technology allowed people from all over the world to connect and be a part of it, he said.

“I am very eager and I can share our culture with other people and people online. We all want them to have the message that we are better together. “

Hip hop artist King Kapisi will perform at the K-Festival in August.  (Archive photo)

Hip hop artist King Kapisi will perform at the K-Festival in August. (Archive photo)

There is, however, one aspect of the festival that will not be able to be adequately experimented with technology: food.

  • The K-Festival will be held at The Trusts Arena in Henderson, West Auckland, on August 14 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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