ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery pieces with virtual reality applications

what if the tissues could respond to body movements? this is the question that led ganit goldstein to create an interactive embroidered piece as part of his master’s degree at the Royal College of Art in London. entitled “rhythm of matter”, the project explores the role of physical materials in a digital space through a fabric with flower patterns with integrated electronics and virtual reality applications.

images courtesy of ganit goldstein

the recent master’s graduate spent three months in eastern Switzerland to produce a 2 x 2 meter large-scale embroidery piece with integrated electronics, which was made possible with the help of saurer machinery. the collaboration was part of a residency program in textile and design alliances, with the support of textilmusuem in st. gallen, and launched by the cantons of the Appenzell Ausserrhoden, St. Gallen and Thurgau.

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

large-scale embroidery pattern with embedded electronics

goldstein worked closely with the saurer R&D team to produce the large piece of fabric. they worked together with special threads that can change the properties of the fabric with a lightweight system integrated with special threads in the specific design. the result is a pattern of flowers that reacts to the movements of the hands using a virtual reality application designed on top of the physical tissue.

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

the tissue reacts to the movements of the hands using a virtual reality application designed on top of the physical tissue.

the VR app reads the movement of the physical hands as the hands approach the physical tissue, where the change appears with an interactive movement of the virtual fabrics. this system, a cycle of day and night, communicates movement, color, and sound through physical gestures of the hands and a system of light.

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR virtual design applications

the VR app reads hand movements as the hands approach the web

research investigates the boundary between “digital hands” and tangible materials: how the former could extend the reality of the latter. wonders whether the haptic experience could be explored differently by the hybrid of remote presence and matter. goldstein’s research on systems embedded within textile creations will continue to be explored through his SMArchS studies in MIT architecture from September 2021, while working on collaborative research with the tangible media group of the MIT media lab.

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

The rhythm of matter explores the role of physical materials in a digital space

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

brightly embroidered fabric was used in the dark

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

more than 100 special needles and threads produced the interactive fabric

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

goldstein worked closely with the saurer R&D team to produce the large piece of fabric

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

the piece exhibited at a graduation ceremony at the Royal College of Art in London

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

close-up view of the repeated shape of the flower, designed to allow movement of the petals

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

goldstein with the final piece

ganit goldstein creates an interactive embroidery piece with VR design applications

the large-scale embroidery piece was produced in collaboration with safer machines as part of the TaDA residence

designboom has received this project from oursDIY shipments“, where we welcome our readers to submit their own papers for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: lynne myers | designboom

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